Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Did We Win?

Yes, social media is free. But what is not free is the time and resources to do social media. With a significant time investment, it is only fair we want to know if our efforts are worth it. Did we win?

Well, that depends on how we measure our success. Success for each one of us can be very different. For me, personally, success is engaging and interacting with my workshop attendees and clients to continually educate and foster relationships. By my own standards then, my social media efforts are definitely worth it. I watch my 'engaged' twitter followers number increase, get LinkedIn invitations from my 'peeps', read posts from followers both on my blog and Facebook Community Page, and see people at workshops who quote information from my blog posts. This proves to me that I am making the connection I want to make. I win! Granted, there is always room for improvement, but in this stage of my goals, I am successful. Others may measure success very differently. Increasing sales/attendance/traffic/users prove success. Whatever your definition of success, know what it is. Define it. 

How do you define success with your social media efforts? What tells you that you are winning?

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

How Could A Recommendation Hurt?

Who doesn't love a good recommendation? When I get a new one on LinkedIn, I am giddy and read it over and over again, just flattered that someone would say such kind things about me. So, how could this possibly hurt? 

As an employer, a recommendation of a current employee could come back to haunt us. According to writer Patrick Smith, The National Law Journal warns about the dangers of using LinkedIn to provide recommendations to current employees. The concern is that a terminated employee may use favorable recommendations on LinkedIn as evidence that the employer's stated reason for termination (such as poor performance) is merely a pretext for discrimination, retaliation, or harassment. Any communications concerning employee performance, regardless of the media, are potential evidence in a lawsuit. 

So, make it your company policy (and include it in your social media policy) that executive management, managers, and supervisors are not authorized to provide recommendations to current employees.